toblackgirls:

The BFI London Film Festival is nearly here! We’ve gone through the A the programme to find all the films staring women of colour. There are admittedly a lot more than we were expecting including Girlhood, Honeytrap and the much anticipated Dear White People.  

(left to right) 

1. Girlhood 

Céline Sciamma (Water Lilies, Tomboy) continues her exploration of the effects of social conventions on delicately forming female identities in her triumphant third film. Sixteen-year-old Marieme (Karidja Touré) must navigate not only the disruptive onset of womanhood, but also the inequalities of being black and living in the underprivileged suburbs of Paris. Excluded from school and in fear of her overbearing brother at home, Marieme escapes into the shielding environment of a girl gang. She renames herself ‘Vic’ for ‘Victory’ and gives up on asking for the things she wants and learns to just take them. Formally meticulous, the film is divided into four distinct segments in which Marieme changes her physical appearance to suit the different worlds she must navigate (school, home, street). Each transformation magnificently captures the heavy burden that visibility and image play in Marieme’s life, whilst Crystel Fournier’s stunning photography that favours a distinctive blue palette ensures that Marieme remains a defiantly vital presence on screen even while it appears she is disappearing from society’s view. The jubilant soundtrack infuses the film with vigour and passion, from the opening juddering electro-goth of Light Asylum’s ‘Dark Allies’ to a full length lip sync to Rhianna’s ‘Diamonds’. With Girlhood Sciamma flawlessly evokes the fragile resilience of youth.

2. My Friend Victoria 

Adapted from a story by Doris Lessing, My Friend Victoria is a complex, poignant portrait of two young black women in contemporary Paris. The film follows them from childhood into adulthood, with the older Fanny narrating the story of her friend and adoptive sister. Aged eight, Victoria spends a night in the home of a wealthy white family; years later, she encounters them again and her life is changed forever. As Fanny and Victoria’s destinies take them in separate directions, the drama offers a distinctly fresh take on racial identity in contemporary France – and on questions of class, privilege and blinkered liberal racism. Superbly acted by newcomers Guslagie Malanda and Nadia Moussa, along with veterans Mouchet and Greggory, My Friend Victoria sees Jean-Paul Civeyrac returning to the LFF after his poetic, elegant Young Girls in Black (2010). His follow-up is an acutely intelligent achievement by a director whose time has surely come.

3. Second Coming 

It’s a bold move to make your debut theatrical feature a modern day take on such a big theological ‘What If?’, and Debbie Tucker Green astonishes with this London-set drama, where the newest family member is neither expected nor biologically possible. Jax (Marshall) works in the welfare office, lives with tube-worker husband (Elba), and their sensitive, nature-loving son JJ who, on the cusp of manhood is constantly looking around him for cues on how to make this transition. It’s rare to see a woman on-screen who remains so taciturn in the face of inner turmoil and as Jax’s self-possession begins to frustrate her friends and family, the film ramps up the tension with Nadine Marshall’s performance creating one of the most unshakable characters in recent memory. Taking the ‘kitchen sink’ tradition of social realism to a fresh new place, it’s a film that lingers, and marks Green as an immediate new voice in British cinema.

4. Honeytrap 

Layla (Jessica Sula) is 15 and has been living in Trinidad. Returned to her estranged mother in Brixton, she is faced with settling into a new home and a new city with a fresh set of rules and codes. Unsupported by her mother and spitefully rejected by her female peers, she is drawn to the brooding Troy, who marks her as his ‘Trini princess’. When that fails, she takes solace in the friendship of Shaun, another admirer, but her desperate need for acceptance leads to a tragic betrayal of his kindness. Director Rebecca Johnson was inspired by real life cases and explores gang culture from a girl’s perspective. Moving beyond the headlines, Johnson gives us an intricately layered and rarely seen perspective – firmly located in the domain of a young girl becoming a woman in a hyper-masculine world. Sula’s performance here is flawless, perfectly capturing the agonising contradiction of Layla’s choice.

5. Appropriate Behaviour 

Shirin breaks up with Maxine, clutching only a strap-on dildo as she storms across Brooklyn. It’s hardly what polite society would deem appropriate behaviour – which is precisely what writer-director-star Desiree Akhavan sets out to challenge in her fearless feature debut. There isn’t an aspect of life that her protagonist, a twentysomething bisexual Iranian-American, can’t overcomplicate and sabotage, be it cultural, professional, sexual or emotional. Veering from desperate bed hopping to disastrous kindergarten moviemaking classes, Akhavan spares herself – and us – nothing of Shirin’s solipsistic neuroses. So it’s all the more impressive that her bracing honesty (‘You can’t keep playing the Persian card’ Maxine scolds) and deft, witty characterisations make for such engaging, empathetic company. The setting, subject and lack of inhibition virtually guarantee Lena Dunham (Girls) comparisons, but Akhavan’s ethnically and sexually specific search for identity onscreen marks out a topography and artistic voice very much her own.

6. Catch Me Daddy 

On the run from her traditional Pakistani family, 17-year-old Laila, along with her boyfriend Aaron, has fled her home for the imposing landscapes of the Yorkshire Moors. As the couple attempt to forge an anonymous existence, unbeknownst to them two groups of men are on their trail, intent on catching up with the young lovers and exacting a brutal punishment at the orders of Laila’s father. Working with famed cinematographer Robbie Ryan (Fish Tank, The Angel’s Share), who captures the vast expanses of the Pennines to stunningly ominous effect, and boasting a devastating central performance by newcomer Sameena Jabeen Ahmed, Daniel and Matthew Wolfe’s hugely impressive debut is a complex and challenging piece of work. In many ways evocative of a British social realist take on John Ford’s The Searchers, with a near-noirish sense of pessimism and bleakness, the film’s observations on family dynamics, race and class are both brutally nihilistic and poetically affecting.

7. August Winds 

The setting of this haunting debut feature from Gabriel Mascaro is a remote village on Brazil’s northeast coast. Shirley (Dandara de Morais), a young woman from the city, has moved there in order to look after her ageing grandmother. She starts dating Jeison (Geová Manoel dos Santos) and gains employment from a local farmer. Filming his actors and the landscape with an unhurried, watchful sensitivity that reflects his documentary background, Mascaro creates an atmospheric portrait of life in this remote community, in particular charting Shirley and Jeison’s heady romance with seductive sensuality. He also introduces a note of disquiet with the arrival of a researcher (played by the director himself) to record the sounds of the changing coastal winds. It also becomes apparent that the village is facing the devastating consequences of global warming. A melancholy and visually sumptuous reflection on a threatened way of life.

8.  Dear White People 

Trouble is brewing at prestigious Ivy League Winchester College. The sole black-only fraternity is to be diversified, to the disgust of firebrand campus DJ Sam White (caustic host of ‘Dear White People’). So when Sam accidentally becomes hall president and word spreads of a rival white college’s ‘African-American-themed party’, she and her fellow black students must reassess where they belong in an alleged ‘post-racial’ Obama nation. Whereas many films that tackle issues reduce their characters to mouthpieces, Justin Simien’s razor-sharp satire makes all his protagonists thrillingly nuanced and conflicted. Visually inventive (the fourth wall regularly takes a pummelling) yet controlled, it’s in the idea stakes that Simien really lets fly, nailing cultural preconceptions of all colours. Early Spike Lee comparisons – notable School Daze and Do The Right Thing – are inevitable and somewhat courted, but Simien passionately makes his own case for provocative, relevant filmmaking: we’ve gotta have it.

9. A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night 

In the deadbeat Iranian ghost town of Bad City, a lone female vampire stalks the streets at night searching for prey. One of the town’s residents is Arash, who through a series of events involving his junkie father, a prostitute and a drug-dealing pimp, encounters the enigmatic bloodsucker and an unlikely love story begins to unfold. Plot may well be secondary to the striking visual language of Ana Lily Amirpour’s arresting debut; its deliberately enigmatic narrative allowing for a superbly ambitious exercise in style and atmosphere. With its stark black and white photography, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is in many ways evocative of the works of Jim Jarmusch, although ironically it bears the strongest resemblance to his early masterwork Stranger than Paradise than it does his own recent vampire film Only Lovers Left Alive. But while Amirpour’s influences are clear, in her effortless blending of multiple genres and monochromatic evocation of a matriarchal underworld, her voice as a singular and exciting new talent is undeniable. If you only see one Iranian vampire western this year, make sure it’s this one.

10. Difret (TW: Rape) 

An affecting feature debut, Difret details the traumatic experience of an Ethiopian girl accused of killing a man who sexually abused her. On her way back home from school, 14-year-old Hirut (Tizita Hagere) is kidnapped by a gang of men and forced into marrying their leader Tadele. She is beaten and raped but manages to free herself, escaping with the rifle she uses to shoot her abductor. Arrested and charged with murder, local justice requires that Hirut is executed and then buried with her victim. However, on hearing about her case a courageous lawyer (Meron Getnet) decides to defend her – at great risk to her own career. Difret, which means ‘courage’ in Amharic, is a delicate yet impassioned story that offers empowerment and hope to countless women all over the world.

More films (not pictured): Beti and Amare, Self Made, War Book and Labour of Love

Tickets go on sale at 10am on Thursday 18th September. You can see the full listing (and any films we missed) as well as information about how to buy tickets on the BFI London FIlm Festival website

(via macanche)

3 weeks ago 5,380 notes

Crumb By Crumb - Rufus Wainwright - Want Two (2007)

(via formerlymomdiggity-deactivated2)

3 weeks ago 17 notes

laborreguitina:

mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.

peekingfromthemargin
!!
4 weeks ago 99,956 notes

maxtoyco:

Phew ! More WiP two King #negora ! One if them will be for the upcoming #monsterkolor show at @piqproducts not sure which 😽

(via novocainelipstick)

1 month ago 31 notes

imaginacorn:

my friend marissa and i thought of puppycat when we heard ‘wiggle’ and this is what it turned into LOL

Editing/photoshop by me
Twerking Bee drawing by marissa

Bee & Puppycat (c) Natasha Allegri + Cartoon Hangover

(via rabbitglitter)

2 months ago 1,123 notes

classicladiesofcolor:

Yvonne Baker, “You Didn’t Say a Word”, 1966

2 months ago 9 notes

theofficialtrans:

queerbutt:

You need dysphoria to be transgender.

The expression of gender characteristics, including identities, that are not stereotypically associated with one’s assigned sex at birth is a common and culturally-diverse human phenomenon that should not be judged as inherently pathological or negative.

— World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH), Standards of Care, V7; Professional Statement on depathologization.

Pathological

  • involving, caused by, or of the nature of a physical or mental disease.
  • caused by or involving disease; morbid.
  • caused by or evidencing a mentally disturbed condition
  • dealing with diseases

1680s, “pertaining to disease,” formed in English from pathology. 

Synonyms: morbid, diseased, sick, ill, unhealthy, aberrant, medical, medical condition

The very document that lays out the treatment for Trans people, and the very organization that is responsible for setting the standards and operating on the research and scientific evidence, state, in very clear terms, that being Trans is not a medical condition, and in addition to that, they state that calling it a medical condition has been proven to be harmful to the health and well being of Trans people.

While many individuals need both hormone therapy and surgery to alleviate their gender dysphoria, others need only one of these treatment options and some need neither (Bockting and Goldberg, 2006; Bockting, 2008; Lev, 2004).

Often with the help of psychotherapy, some individuals integrate their trans- or cross-gender feelings into the gender role they were assigned at birth and do not feel the need to feminize or masculinize their body. For others, changes in gender role and expression are sufficient to alleviate gender dysphoria. Some patients may need hormones, a possible change in gender role, but not surgery; others may need a change in gender role along with surgery, but not hormones.

Some individuals describe themselves not as gender nonconforming but as unambiguously cross-sexed (i.e., as a member of the other sex; Bockting, 2008).

Other individuals affirm their unique gender identity and no longer consider themselves either male or female (Bornstein, 1994; Kimberly, 1997; Stone, 1991; Warren, 1993). Instead, they may describe their gender identity in specific terms such as transgender, bigender, or genderqueer, affirming their unique experience that may transcend a male/female binary understanding of gender (Bockting, 2008; Ekins and King, 2006; Nestle, Wilchins, and Howell, 2002).

They may not experience their process of identity affirmation as a “transition,” because they never fully embraced the gender role they were assigned at birth or because they actualize their gender identity, role, and expression in a way that does not involve a change from one gender role to another.

For example, some youth identifying as genderqueer have always experienced their gender identity and role as such (genderqueer).

This is why professionals involved in the care and well being of Trans people who are culturally competent and knowledgeable, do not engage with it on those terms.

Dysphoria does not make someone a trans person. Being a trans person is what makes someone have dysphoria. 

Not because they are trans. But because the world they live in is not designed for, considerate of, or permissible for, trans people.

(via transawareness)

2 months ago 506 notes
you're probably just those fucking stupid tumblr social justice police trying to justify yourself -- how can you even be already analyzing moana when you don't even know what polynesian culture is like.?ugh, gtfo.
Anonymous

fuatino:

sifu-korras:

Nobody’s trying to justify anything, I was merely stating my thoughts, or is that not allowed anymore?

By the way, this is me:

image

Fairly Polynesian if you ask me. 

HEY-OH *spirit fingers*

As a minority whose race is going to be represented by a company who doesn’t have a shining track record in terms of POC representation, I think I have a right to be concerned and rather nit picky. 

Is it a crime to make sure any of these cultures — whichever ones are showcased in this movie — aren’t being exploited in any manner? Because Polynesian refers to more than one culture, multiple really, whose differences people don’t see. I could not tell you the number of times I had to explain to someone what Samoan was and they reply with, “Oh, so you’re Hawaiian?”

Audiences need to know that Polynesians are way more than a group of people supposedly living in a “tropical Hawaiian paradise.” We are more than ukuleles, grass skirts, and coconut bras. We are more than the flower and kukui leis round our necks; the seis adorning our hair; our frickin sick tattoos.

As an Islander living in a place where I am constantly mistaken as Asian or Hispanic because nobody has ever heard of Samoan or Tongan or Tokelauan, Fijian, Niuean, and all the rest, you had better believe that when my people are given the chance to be represented, I am definitely gonna be there, making sure everything is done right

Perhaps, since they’re talking mythology and whatnot, Disney’s gonna make Moana of the Lapita people, who are the ancestral Pacific Islanders. Who knows? I do know this: I can voice my own opinion with how Disney dishes out culture on this film, seeing as it’s my own.

this is fuckin it right here, y’all. “”polynesian”” is a western concept too, which is a founding problem in the film’s supposed portrayal OF “”polynesian”” mythology because it’s homogenizing similar but ultimately diverse cultures. Oceania as a whole (so polynesian, micronesia, and melanesia for those that recognize those colonial terms) have similar cultures among the myriad islands because of a history of navigation and interaction with one another (here the Samoan tatau/tattoo from Fiji comes to mind). so when Disney is saying Moana is a “”polynesian”” princess, they obviously haven’t really done their research because polynesia itself is a western construct/label imposed on islanders. them using this label echoes the homogenization that was done in pocahontas and it DEFINITELY doesn’t make me excited, as a fellow Samoan (CHEEHOO, btw - malo lava, madame-fussybritches! glad to see more islanders concerned about this) 

i could break this down more (and in fact might on animatedactivism soon HMMMMMM) but don’t come at islanders who’re concerned about this movie. we, indeed, have every right to be since our representation in popular media ranges from invisible to complete horseshit.

classicladiesofcolor:

Holly Maxwell, “Only When You’re Lonely”, ca. 1970

2 months ago 51 notes

yumizoomi:

sour

2 months ago 13,154 notes

sirtophatthethird:

wayfaring-mermaid:

specialagentofthelamb:

This woman deserves a round of applause and a throne of gold. This is the most realistic & amazing thing for someone to say for this generation of students. I wasn’t able to go to college this year because my parents can’t afford to send me and I had every scholarship, grant, loan known to man and it still wouldn’t work. Finally someone gets it!

Preach!

WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR PEOPLE TO REALIZE THIS?!

SO MANY OTHER COUNTRIES EITHER PAY FOR THEIR POPULATIONS’ EDUCATION OR JUST WRITE OFF THE BILL IF DOESN’T GET PAID FOR.

THE WAY THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM WORKS IS BACKWARDS AND MANGLED.

(via specialagentfuckingasshole)

2 months ago 601,929 notes

asylum-art:

Junko Mori: Steel Sculptures

artist on tumblr

Born in Yokohama, Japan in 1974, Junko Mori is a Japanese metal worker; she graduated from Musashino Art University with a BA in three-dimensional design. After working for a year as a welder in a factory, she moved on to studying silversmithing and metal work at Camberwell College of Arts in London. She is known for her organic, minimalist design.

(via asylum-art)

2 months ago 1,122 notes

maghrabiyya:

somepalestiniankid:

somepalestiniankid:

Also since we’re here, I’m all for denouncing Zionism but can we please avoid the antisemitism

Israel =/= Jews
Jews =/= pro-Israel

This includes sending threatening messages to Jews, posting cartoons with blood libel, posting cartoons portraying Jews as antisemitic caricatures, associating Nazism with Israel or intertwining swastikas with Star of Davids.

That is all, have a nice day

3, 000 notes. Let’s hope people follow through with this tho

Ugh I had the most frustrating conversation with an extremely antisemitic Moroccan a week ago.

Please don’t equate Jews to Zionists.

2 months ago 4,317 notes
you're probably just those fucking stupid tumblr social justice police trying to justify yourself -- how can you even be already analyzing moana when you don't even know what polynesian culture is like.?ugh, gtfo.
Anonymous

sifu-korras:

Nobody’s trying to justify anything, I was merely stating my thoughts, or is that not allowed anymore?

By the way, this is me:

image

Fairly Polynesian if you ask me. 

HEY-OH *spirit fingers*

As a minority whose race is going to be represented by a company who doesn’t have a shining track record in terms of POC representation, I think I have a right to be concerned and rather nit picky. 

Is it a crime to make sure any of these cultures — whichever ones are showcased in this movie — aren’t being exploited in any manner? Because Polynesian refers to more than one culture, multiple really, whose differences people don’t see. I could not tell you the number of times I had to explain to someone what Samoan was and they reply with, “Oh, so you’re Hawaiian?”

Audiences need to know that Polynesians are way more than a group of people supposedly living in a “tropical Hawaiian paradise.” We are more than ukuleles, grass skirts, and coconut bras. We are more than the flower and kukui leis round our necks; the seis adorning our hair; our frickin sick tattoos.

As an Islander living in a place where I am constantly mistaken as Asian or Hispanic because nobody has ever heard of Samoan or Tongan or Tokelauan, Fijian, Niuean, and all the rest, you had better believe that when my people are given the chance to be represented, I am definitely gonna be there, making sure everything is done right

Perhaps, since they’re talking mythology and whatnot, Disney’s gonna make Moana of the Lapita people, who are the ancestral Pacific Islanders. Who knows? I do know this: I can voice my own opinion with how Disney dishes out culture on this film, seeing as it’s my own.

toeianimation:

Beats. I’m going back. | Soundcloud

(via toeianimation)

2 months ago 100 notes